Love EVERY Body #4 : Chest

20140314-003804.jpg

Hullo loves!

So this is the fourth Love EVERY Body post and it’s about the chest.
If you’ve been around my blogosphere you’re familiar with this body positivity workshop run by my awesome friend Leah of the blog Just Me Leah

20140314-023058.jpg

I was conscious about my breasts from my teens. It wasn’t because I was well endowed. It had to do with being a tomboy and discovering my femininity. Looking at other girls wearing tight tops and maxi-bras to show off, I really didn’t know what the big deal was. What were these annoying lumps of skin at my chest that didn’t allow me to throw my top off after a sweaty run and why were they so desired?

Mine have always been pendulous and set wide apart, which was not how I imagined breasts to look like. Alright well I was thankful I didn’t have a third breast ala Total Recall or a third nipple like Chandler! (‘Friends’ fans will get this).

My parents came from two different schools of thought about how much I could show my dΓ©colletage off. Mom told us to embrace our body and curves, flaunt their beauty. Dad wanted us covering our knees and shoulders.

The Asian society is still relatively conservative with displays of dΓ©colletage and cleavage. As cosmopolitan as we appear to be and as modern as we dress up… You will still get an old auntie tut-tutting away as she passes you by, when you’re in a form fitting dress.

I must admit, I was less concerned with covering up when I was around my Malay and Chinese counterparts.
The Indians were a different story. I think my fellow Indians know why. I don’t want to get started on an angry tirade of how us Indian women tend to be objectified and disrespected.

So I struggled with how I should dress up for a while because I wasn’t sure what was ‘decent’ enough. I covered myself in baggy tops and jeans, refusing to show my form.

I must thank my past muses and the hubster for bringing me out of my shell by embracing my voluptuousness. I found myself wanting to wear nicer bras to look snug in a tank top. I found myself wanting to wear tank tops to embrace my upper body’s curvature!

With the exception of that period between 2008-2010 that I call The Darkest Hours, I have never shied away from loving my upper lady parts. Living in Australia made me feel a whole lot comfortable and unapologetic for dressing as I see fit, and not how society sees fit. I was not going to feel smothered in my clothing! This is my personal choice.

I have fleshy arms and they are bared because I live in a swelteringly warm country. Deal with it.

I have ample breasts and I love them.
I will wear low neck tops, snug tees, figure hugging dresses as much as I will wear crew neck tops, baggy sweaters and cotton nighties. I don’t show my breasts off to prove a point. They’re just there, they look great and that’s that.

20140314-023258.jpg

My body was not always the plus size hour glass proportion that it is today.
I will have you know that I was considerably flat chested until my 20s!
I didn’t complain though, I liked being more aerodynamic when running πŸ˜‰

Today, my running days are over and my flat chest is not that flat now. And I don’t mind it. In fact, I rather like it.
They fill out nicely in a swimsuit, they are very soft and I know one person besides me who enjoys having them around πŸ˜‰

My family medical history is pretty sordid with cancers, heart trouble and high cholesterol but breast cancer has not come up. That doesn’t mean that I don’t get them checked. Better to be safe.

I know of friends who developed breasts much earlier and were made to feel badly about that. They were rudely awakened to their sexuality at a tender age. I also know of friends who would die for a pair of breasts bigger than their A cup ones. Personally, I don’t think breast size should be used as an indicator of womanliness and sensuality. Embrace the body you have and you will be the sexiest damn thing in the room.

This was not as difficult a post to type.
The post next month however, will be challenging. And you know I’m always up for a challenge πŸ˜‰

Im curious to find out how my readers feel about their chests. If you feel comfortable enough to lend me your personal thoughts, I’d love to read them.

Til my fashion post,
xxxo Aarti Olivia

Advertisements

One thought on “Love EVERY Body #4 : Chest

  1. My boo boos are quite wide set as well, and I used to beat myself up about it because I didn’t realise that boobs come in all different varieties. Seeing a vast array of boobies on Tumblr and places like that made me feel much more normal.

    I agree that women’s bodies are horribly sexualised from a young age because of their chests. My boobs were first commented on by a man in a sexual way when I was 14. Fourteen, FFS! I hate that big breasted girls are thought of as ‘easy’ and small chested girls are thought of as manly or less feminine (by some people, at least.) They’re physical characteristics – nothing more, nothing less. I’m glad you have a healthy attitude to your boobs. ❀

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s